There are many concepts that were abandoned in games but later made a comeback in other generations.

Like the classic Marble Madness, by Midway, created by Mark Cerny (yes, Mark Cerny, by Sony), in which we had to guide a marble through amazing courses. Despite the game’s success (it was ported to 15 different platforms), it never got a sequel. (Marble Man: Marble Madness II was canceled due to an arcade test error.)

READ – Omno | a lonely journey

There have been other games that have reproduced the idea of ​​obstacle courses for spherical objects over time. And one of those games was Orbibot by Ratalaika Games, which was recently released for consoles.

Will you face this?

Is a spherical robot a robola?

Since Orbibot doesn’t have a script and I’m in no mood to invent one, let’s get to the point. One of the things that doesn’t really count in Orbibot’s favor is that the presentation of the game itself is very, very basic. But anyway, now that that’s out of the way, here we go.

Orbibot is a physics puzzle game in which we’ll use a spherical robot and have to complete fifteen levels with different obstacles. In this, the game somewhat resembles Marble Madness, but that’s where the similarities end.

READ – My First Sega Saturn

Here we don’t have any MM enemies, but in order to go through different parts of the stages, some puzzles have to be solved.

Their complexity increases as you progress through the game, but one of the things you can do to give yourself an edge is to use the game’s physics in your favor and pave the way to the point , where you have at least two stages in the game that I don’t know how they are complete because I quickly went from start to finish cutting paths.

Physics doesn’t allow it

Orbibot

Game controls are simple, you move with the analog stick, you can rotate the camera and zoom in or out. In the levels with puzzles, when you press the triangle, a light signal will show you what to do in each puzzle.

I said that this is a puzzle game with physics, but the physics part is partly because… physics is somehow not respected in many moments of the game, be it a stage where the ball that should go down a path gets stuck the fact that if you fall out of the scenario (where physics works), your ball can reach much higher speeds, which is possible in certain cases (as I said in the previous section of this review), skipping entire levels

The game is short and you can finish it in an hour or two depending on your patience and the repetition factor comes from having fun and trying to complete levels as fast as possible or finding ways to skip the stages Stage.

Pleasant but repetitive

Orbibot

Orbibot’s look won’t catch your eye. Indeed it will, but for the fact that all phases have the same theme, with additions of new relative gimmicks. It’s not like Kororinpa: Marble Saga, which has different maps, or Marble Madness, where the stages are different colors.

Despite the overly simplistic presentation, the look is clean and pleasant. Sonically, Orbibot is hard to categorize, the robot is obviously making some robotic noises a la R2D2 and the game’s music… They’re weird.

READ – The Killing Blade – Arcade

Not the compositions themselves, but the game’s music selection seems to be the most random in the world. Sometimes you find yourself in a very complicated part of the game that would call for an action song, but the background music is something ultra calm. And sometimes you think there’s an upbeat song playing in the first phase.

And yes, the in-game songs play randomly, and if I’m not mistaken, they’re royalty-free songs. Unfortunately the game does not have a credits screen, so I cannot confirm this information.

a cheap distraction

Orbibot

If you liked Marble Madness and miss Marble Madness games, you should try Orbibot. Is it a little awkward? Yes, but it’s a very fun game and an easy Platinum/1000G for your account.

The game is available for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One and Xbox Series.

This review was conducted using a digital copy of the PlayStation 4 kindly provided by Ratalaika Games.

Author

Write A Comment